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Normalerweise halte ich mich mit Kritik zurück, aber der Hype um das Bali Eco Restaurant ist für uns gänzlich unverständlich. Zwar alle sehr freundlich, aber sehr sehr langsam (und wir waren die einzigen Gäste...), Indofood sehr spärlich bzw. gerade aus, dafür Rösti&Geschnetzeltes, und fürchterlich zerstochen von Mücken. Deshalb entfiel auch der ecoWalk...dennoch Ketut (der Inhaber) war sehr sehr nett. ... See MoreSee Less

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Statusupdate 16.10.2017 15.30 Uhr Bali-Time: die Aktivitäten des #Vulkan #Gunung #Agung halten weiterhin an, deshalb haben wir heute den Vulkan Gunung Batur besucht. Erstmalig waren wir im Geolocal Museum und in den Natural Hot Springs (sehr idyllisch, 150.00 IDR inkl Handtücher, „welcome drinks und Snack“ und abschließbaren Schränkchen, nicht verwechseln mit der Partyquelle Toya Devasya!) und haben auch den Pura Hulundanu Batur Songan ausgiebig erkundet. Aus religiösem Anstand von dort keine Fotos, lohnt aber in jedem Fall, sich selbst einmal dorthin zu begeben.

#iaminbalinow
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Status Update 15.10.2017: die Aktivitätskurven steigen wieder an. Der Governeur hat den „Notstandstatus“ für die 12 km Zone bis zum 26.10.2017 verlängert. Dennoch: Business as usual. ... See MoreSee Less

15 October Daily tracking of seismic activity since we went to Level 4. More detailed, 6-hourly tracking for the past few days. Key points to watch for: a) more than 1,000 quakes per day; b) more than 100 shallow quakes in a 6-hour period. More than 200 shallow quakes per day is considered a high level of activity, indicating active magma pushing upwards.

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Statusupdate 14.10.2017 9.30 Uhr Bali-Time:
Erdbeben der Stärke 4.5 bei Sumbawa um 0.46 Uhr, zu spüren noch an der Südküste Balis. Vulkanische Aktivität des #Vulkan #Gunung #Agung leicht erhöht. Bitte weiterhin die live Daten von

magma.vsi.esdm.go.id

Beobachten.
Status ob der Amedregion: Business as usual
#iaminbalinow
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Da schnorchelt man so vor sich hin... ... See MoreSee Less

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Resumee of the day: #vulkan #gunung #agung puffing a little bit more it seems, but come to Lipah(Pondok Vienna Beach) and Bunutan (Good Karma Bungalows) and have amazing snorkel trips! #iaminbalinow ... See MoreSee Less

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Auch eine Art der Unterstützung von Balis. Da sich unsere Freunde in Karangasem für die letzte große Zeremonie kein Babi Guling leisten konnten, haben wir kurzum die ganze Familie samt halben Dorf zum Festmahl eingeladen. Den Kindern brachten wir Spielsachen mit, die wir immer bei den Airlines auf dem Hinflug „erbitten“ und deshalb so besonders sind, weil sie von so weit weg herkommen. So viel Freude, Herzlichkeit und Dankbarkeit gibt uns so viel zurück. Om shanti shanti shanti Om. ... See MoreSee Less

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Background: ... See MoreSee Less

For the business owners who are struggling right now with empty hotels and restaurants, there's some help I would like to share with you! Who? The #IAminBaliNow campaign is a collaboration between travel agents, resorts, shops, restaurants, yoga centers, suppliers all located in Bali and showing care for their island with the support of tourism experts, both national and international, and special support and guidance coming from the Nepalese team who launched Nepal Now, after the devastating earthquake Nepal suffered in the spring of 2015. How does it work? 1. Print & laminate a #iaminBaliNOW poster attached to this post and available on the Facebook page. 2. Explain the campaign to your staff 3. Explain it to tourists and let them to take selfies with their phone to share on social media tagging your business and`#iaminBaliNOW IMPORTANT: If you are a tourism operator located in Bali, please help us by sharing positive contents of your actual activities and traveller's experiences on your social media outlet using the hashtag #iaminBaliNOW Social media: www.facebook.com/iaminBaliNOW twitter.com/iaminBaliNOW www.instagram.com/iaminBaliNOW We urge you to encourage people to visit Bali, as tourism is one of the main economic activities that generates much needed jobs and injects much-needed currency into our economy - especially critical in this time of need. Thanks for collaborating with our island! Stay safe! They are also organizing a webinar to help business owners learn how to communicate in time of crisis. It's free and ONLY for business owners, not for the general public. www.jeffchatterton.com/balivolcano/

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Statusupdate 11.10.2017 17.45 Bali Time: #Vulkan #Gunung #Agung Sundowner Live View: she is „puffing“ from time to time. Warung Bobo, #Amed #Karangasem ... See MoreSee Less

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Statusupdate unter Wasser: alles ruhig. Besucht das Good Karma Bungalows, aktuell sind wir die einzigen Gäste hier, die Region ist nahezu ausgestorben. ... See MoreSee Less

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Status 10.10.2017 19.00 Uhr Bali Time aus Karangasem, Bunutan, Café Indah: nix zu spüren, nix zu sehen, für Oktober ist es nahezu ausgestorben. Morgen Schnorcheln und schauen, ob wir einen Blick auf den Gunung Agung werfen können. Vorab ein Interview mit #drjanineknipper ... See MoreSee Less

Science sense in the midst of rumbles, rumours, sensationalism and conspiracy theories Dr Janine Krippner chats to Keith Lyons One of the guest contributors to this page is volcanologist Dr Janine Krippner who has been a source of information and expertise, and who maintains updates on Twitter for thousands around the world interested in the possible eruption of Agung. So how did she end up being the ‘go-to’ person for all things volcanic, and where on earth is she? Keith Lyons found out about the person behind the regular Tweets, calm voice and re-assuring scientific answers. KL: So how did you get involved in the communication about volcanos and Agung’s possible eruption? JK: I have been doing volcano updates since 2013, so I posted a couple of tweets about Agung, then I got a message from a friend of mine who was a tourist in Bali saying ‘Is the Bali volcano going to explode? . He said he had heard that the volcano is on high alert of imminent eruption and flights are getting cancelled. After looking around online I realized that people like him – who do not speak the local language, had no idea what was happening, or how to find out. I had to do something. I did not have any idea of where it would lead. KL: How do you get information out there to others - mainly on Twitter and your blog? JK: Yes. I have been on twitter and writing a blog for a few years now, reporting on volcanic activity around the world. I love volcanoes so this has been my ‘hobby’ throughout my PhD. This is the platform I continue to use to get out information. KL: So you have a long interest in volcanoes? What is your background? JK: I knew I would be a volcanologist when I was 13 years old. Since then I got a Bachelors and Masters degrees at the University of Waikato (New Zealand) in Earth Sciences and Volcanology. I lived in Australia for a few years working as a geologist, then I moved to the USA where I just finished my PhD. I got the diploma in the mail a few days ago. KL: What is the attraction of working with volcanoes and being a volcanologist for you? JK: I have loved volcanoes from such a young age that I don’t remember how or why. I was fascinated with them long before I knew that I could actually be a volcanologist. This is what I am passionate about and nothing else can change that. I want to help understand volcanoes better (with the rest of the volcanology community) to help in situations just like this. To answer the question ‘what can this volcano do and how might it affect people?’ KL: You’ve worked in New Zealand, what other places have you studied? JK: My Masters research was on Ngauruhoe volcano in New Zealand. My PhD research was on Shiveluch volcano in Kamchatka – a very active volcano, and Mount St. Helens in the USA. I began research on Merapi in Indonesia but I couldn’t get the right information that I needed on the deposits from the 2010 eruption. KL: So you grew up in New Zealand, have worked and studied around the world, and now are in the US. What are the challenges for you being in the US on the other side of the world to Bali where it is all happening, or doesn’t it really matter in this day and age, with access to information via internet? JK: I am tired. I have made sure I am taking care of myself – you are not helpful to others if you’re in bad shape. I have been getting a good amount of sleep but being up all night takes its toll. I have set up a support system across several time zones so that I can get sleep. KL: How do you see your role in helping analysing the reports coming out of Agung, translating them, and spreading them to people seeking information? JK: Purely to make sure that people have access to the right information. I am not, in any way, giving my own interpretations of the data. I fully respect the local monitoring team and the hard work they are doing. I have also been working to help people to understand volcanology concepts and processes. I believe that having the right information is so important and this is made difficult by rumors and scaremongering. KL: Why do you think there is so much attention on Agung compared to other volcanoes around the world which may be active or erupting right now? JK: There are plenty of volcanoes erupting or showing activity all the time. Here we have a situation where there is a volcano threatening to erupt in an area that has a large tourism industry. Look at Sinabung – Sinabung has been erupting nearly continuously since 2013, affecting thousands, and the world did not know. KL: How do you communicate complexity and help others understand that many factors come into play about the volcano erupting? JK: The more you know, the more you know you don't know. Having been following volcanic activity for nearly 2 decades (professionally and in my own time) I know that there are many ways that this can go. I have learned through the experiences of others that this can lead to no eruption, a small eruption, a larger eruption, and many steps in between. It has also been a challenge to convey how even though we have great technology in 2017, we can’t actually directly see the magma. Plus, there are so many components in this magmatic system that are changing as time progresses. KL: Why do you think many want scientists to predict the eruption with the day and time? JK: We want to predict the eruptions too! We want to help people. It’s that simple. In areas where there are sparse populations you still have air traffic overhead that might be affected. Look at Eyjafjallajökull a few years ago. We don’t want to see people in evacuation camps for weeks, and we don’t want to give a warning too late. If we could predict volcanic eruptions then we could hopefully prevent most death and injury. The volcanology community has seen so much devastation. In 1985 a pretty small eruption at Nevado del Ruiz resulted in the death of around 22,000 people. This made the community stand up and say ‘never again’. KL: As the reports coming out only are released every few days, and that the volcano hasn’t erupted yet, do you think it means that it creates an environment where others come up with theories, predictions and reasons? JK: There are many opinions out there. I think I can speak for pretty much all volcanologists when I say that no one can predict what this volcano will do with any certainty. The volcanologists who are monitoring this volcano have all of the data and the cumulative knowledge of the global community behind them. KL: How does the unknown factors about the possible eruption make it challenging? JK: A book could be written to answer this question. Every volcano is different, and a single volcano can produce a range of eruption types (depending on the volcano type and geological location). The more we know about the history of a single volcano, the more we know about what it can do in the future. But to pin it down, to know what this volcano is going to do in the next day or week – we would need to know how the magma is doing right now, and how this is going to change. This involves understanding chemistry, gasses, crystals, viscosity, the speed at which it is moving, the temperatures, the rock it is moving through… There are so many factors. KL: On this FB page we see a lot of comments commending you and saying that your posts are the main source of information. What has been some feedback you have received since your posts have gained wide readership? JK: It has been overwhelmingly positive and full of gratitude. I have been so focused on the volcano that it was a real surprise when people wanted to know more about me! For me, this has never been about me. KL: How does it make you feel to know that you have been a reliable voice at this time when there are other claims and voices with different agendas trying to influence people? JK: This is what I have wanted to do since I was a kid – help people around volcanoes. I am humbled and grateful that everyone has been so kind, patient, and respectful. KL: What things have you learnt so far, in being one of the key people in between scientists and the public? JK: I have been learning so much that I have, and will continue to discuss with the volcanology community. #1 is to be very clear that I am not interpreting the data and to consistently link to the official sources. The #2 thing would be drawing in many people to help. I have had ~60 volcanologists, geoscientists, and science communicators give support in some way. This has been through checking what I am doing to make sure I am doing it right, helping me with their specialty to make sure I am using the right wording, keeping an eye on things for me while I sleep, making sure Google translations are correct, etc. This has been a big team effort. KL: You’re concerned about the plight of refugees, animals and others affected by the volcano. Why is that? Shouldn’t you just worry about the volcano? JK: Absolutely. I have a deep love and respect for people and animals as well as volcanoes. Every person is important. Their animals are important. It breaks my heart to see people and animals get hurt during eruptions and volcanic activity. That has not lessened as I continue through my career. KL: What are the most frequently questions you get asked? JK: When is it going to erupt? Should I cancel my trip? Am I safe? KL: What are the biggest myths or misconceptions that you are finding are held by people about volcanoes and eruptions? JK: That we can tell what the magma is going to do. That just because we have the technology that we do today, that we can predict a very complex and constantly changing system like a volcano (possible in rare cases). That we are doing this job for a reason other than our love of volcanoes and to help people. That we hide information for some stupid selfish reason that I cannot comprehend. KL: What are the questions you can’t or don’t answer? JK: Anything that has to do with me giving interpretations on the volcano – that is the job of the local monitoring team. I do not have the expertise and it is not my place. I will not give people advice on what to do, only give information on how to prepare and where to find the information to make that decision. KL: What are some of the craziest ideas you have heard in recent days about the volcano? JK: That the entire Pacific Rim is connected and eruptions are increasing everywhere (they are not). That bomb testing in North Korea is causing an increase in volcanic activity in faraway counties (it is not). That Sinabung and Agung are connected (they are not). Then there was also something about a magmatic reversal? KL: Is one of the problems with Agung that the most affected people are going to be locals, but the many foresters living or visiting Bali who don’t have much info in English are worried? JK: Every person that is affected is important. I understand that people are worried about their businesses while others are worried about returning home after two weeks. Both of these groups matter. Everyone has different worries and stresses and they all matter. I hope that by giving people the right information that they can make decisions on what to do for themselves. It is important for people to feel empowered in these situations. The right information can help with that in many situations. KL: Do you think if scientists say what has happened in the past, and what may happen now, it is scaremongering or creating fear, because it might not happen? JK: This is the information that we have and I think it is important for us to be open and honest about it. If we didn’t tell people what we know – that would be very dishonest and downright wrong. Imagine if we were not telling anyone anything? That would be infuriating, wouldn’t it? It is also important to communicate the uncertainties that go along with this information. KL: Is the emphasis on preparedness, getting masks and goggles, and the evacuation of people in anticipation of an eruption an over-reaction, because so far nothing has happened, and maybe it never will? JK: No. If nothing happens you are stuck with a set of face mask and goggles. If nothing happens then people have been through an ordeal in evacuation camps. If no one was prepared and something does happen – you have no idea how to keep yourself safe. You breathe in volcanic ash, lose some of your electronics, and get ash in your eyes (which might not be deadly but we all know how hard it is to function with something stuck in our eyes). If no one evacuates and something does happen – many people could die. Many people could lose loved ones and friends. So even if something doesn’t happen, which of these two scenarios would you rather have? Which of these scenarios would you be more upset at the authorities over? KL: Balinese priests said the climbed the mountain to prove the scientists wrong, and some foreigners say that the volcano hasn’t erupted shows that science doesn’t have the answers - what do you say? JK: In this case, science is about making the best interpretations with the best data available. It is also about incorporating the collective global experience of hundreds of volcanologists with this data. This all tells us that magma is moving, and it could result in a range of scenarios. This has led to precautionary measures to protect people. I understand that people are frustrated. I hear you. I wish that science meant having psychic powers and looking into the future to see exactly what this volcano will do, but that is not our reality. KL: Others in Bali say the warnings to the highest level, and the travel advisories from governments, are turning away tourists, and some are angry that even though nothing has happened, this is damaging their business - what do you say? JK: I feel for you all. I really do. This sucks. This is a really frustrating situation for so many reasons and I hear you. As far as the warning goes – look at how fast the volcanic activity increased to such high levels. The authorities made the right call with the information that they had. I cannot fault them at all. Volcanoes kill people. No one wants to see anyone die here. KL: Do you think scientists might be blamed if it doesn’t erupt? JK: People always look to blame someone. I hope not. The scientists have been doing their job to monitor the volcano and warn people of the potential hazards. They are in a difficult situation and they are doing a great job. KL: What are the conflicts between how science works and what the media and the public want in terms of certainty, answers, predictions? JK: Science works to monitor the volcano and record the signals that the magma and surrounding rock are giving, then interpret what this means with all of the knowledge that we have. This has saved thousands of lives in recent history because of how science has progressed. The media, the public, and the scientists all want certainty in knowing what this thing will do. We are all in this boat together. KL: Is the possible eruption of Agung exciting? JK: No. Not to me. I am concerned about everyone involved and I am trying to figure out what is the best way to help with this current situation and in future scenarios around the world. Volcanoes are exciting when people are not suffering. KL: What is it like being near an active volcano? JK: For me, it feels like home. Like this is where I am supposed to be. It’s exciting and calming at the same time. Where people have been hurt it is also a very sad place to be. It inspires so many questions that we have yet to answer. KL: If you had a chance, would you like to be near the volcano right now, at a monitoring station or observation spot? If so, what things would you be looking for? JK: If I had all of the expertise (which I do not), I would be looking out for the trends that Agung is showing across the entire range of data. Situations like this call for different types of monitoring data, and each one of those requires someone specialized in that exact technique. This is a team effort. KL: How does ash affect you? gases? JK: It ranges from being irritating to being a real health hazard depending on who is affected. People with preexisting conditions (asthma, COPD) can be worse off. Gases can be very irritating, to fatal in areas where they accumulate in depressions in the ground. Gases are not usually a big hazard, while ash is much more widespread and can affect different areas or even countries over time. KL: Does knowing more about how volcanoes work make you more sure that science will eventually know everything, or that it gives you more awe or wonder about the world? JK: It definitely gives me more awe and wonder. Will we know everything? I am hopeful but doubtful. There are >1200 potentially active volcanoes around the world (that have erupted geologically recently). That we know of. These all behave differently. There is a lot of work to do! Be sure to follow Janine on Twitter for the latest updates from Dr Janine Krippner (@janinekrippner). And check her page on inthecompanyofvolcanoes.blogspot.my/2017/09/agung-volcano-unrest-information.html What to help? 1. Make a donation or support one of the many organisations working evacuees such Agung Relief Effort where our friend Kenny is doing an amazing job with others earthmattersinfo@gmail.com e-mail for information & Pay Pal donations earthmattersinfo@gmail.com Outside Indonesia: +62 813 3911 0240 Within Indonesia: 0813 3911 0240 2. Complete a survey about preparedness or perceptions If you are in Bali: www.surveymonkey.com/r/PDSCDLS About preparedness and information: www.surveymonkey.com/r/H7TTYT6 If you left Bali: www.surveymonkey.com/r/PCNZY7H 3. If you would like more information in a graphic format about volcanoes, preparedness and the results of surveys, available to more people, contact us about making a donation so we can pay a graphic designer to do this (all work on this FB page is done voluntarily, without payment, as a labour of love) 4. Share this page with others. addtext.com/X4WqiiA

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Heute mal ein privates Hauskonzert... Welcome to the hotel Balifornia ... See MoreSee Less

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Status Update 7.10.2017 23.00 Uhr Bali-Time:
#Vulkan #Gunung #Agung die Wasserdampf-Fahne (keine Aschewolke!) steigt bis auf 1500 m über dem Krater auf (ca. 4600m über dem Meeresspiegel). Sie zieht langsam ostwärts und beeinträchtigt aktuell nicht den Flugverkehr von und nach Bali. Das im englischen benutzte Wort dafür (Plume) bitte nicht mit der deutschen geologischen Bedeutung Plume verwechseln.

www.facebook.com/Bali.Mount.Agung.Refugees/posts/1533100860089922

Bitte weiterhin auch über

magma.vsi.esdm.go.id/vona/

informieren.
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Mount Agung right now 9.55pm smoke up to 1.5km high [don't be confuse IT'S NOT ERUPTION] Le volcan Agung ce soir fume jusqu'à 1Km à 21.55 (pas de confusion, ce n'est pas une eruption) Gunung Agung malam ini jam 9.55 mengeluarkan asap (ini bukan erupsi) Fanty Fang Robin Epe Cathy Wigati Denissot Nova Hafaz Jola Prusak Jb Dem Paweł P Bartnik Mark L Chaves

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Bali-Sarong in traditioneller Handarbeit in Heimarbeit von Bapaks Schwiegertochter.
Auf einen Holzrahmen werden Stofffäden umlaufend gespannt, diese werden zu kleinen Bündeln zusammengefasst. Ein traditionelles Muster wird mit einem Buntstift aufgebracht und diese Musterlinien werden dann mit Plastikschnüren auf den einzelnen Bündeln zusammengeknotet. Wenn diese Arbeit nach 6 bis 8 Stunden erledigt ist, wird der Stoff Querverwoben und gefärbt. Nach Trocknung entfernt sie die Plastikschnüre und die Stoffbündelchen werden leicht aufgerauht.
Der ganze Prozess dauert mehrere Tage.

Erlös für einen fertigen Sarong unter Balinesen: ca. 200.000 IDR.
Sofern erhältlich für den Touristen: 400.000 IDR.
Der Erlös für die Weberin: ca. 30.000 IDR. Aktueller EUR / IDR Wechselkurs: 1 / 15.700 . By the way: Schachtel Zigaretten: 17.200 IDR.

Handeln gehört auf Bali dazu.

Als Bule sollte man aber stets auch hinterfragen, wie weit man handeln möchte, um später noch in den Spiegel schauen zu können.

Seit Jahren gehören wir zur Familie, sind immer als Angehörige des Dorfes angesehen worden, kennen die Bräuche, Familien, Gepflogenheiten; haben unsere Rechte aber auch Pflichten wenn wir hier sind und dennoch beschämt es mich zu sehen, wie unterschiedlich die Welten doch sind. Glücklichsein, Glaube, Freude und Friede haben hier einen wichtigeren Stellenwert als wir es kennen.
Und während beim Bule seine entspannte Gesichtsmuskelatur ein trauriges Gesicht darstellt, glaube ich, ist die entspannte Balinesengesichtsmuskelatur immer noch ein freundlich freudiges Lächeln.

Nur mal so am Rande.
Selamat tidur.
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Ceremony and prayings. ... See MoreSee Less

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Status Live-Update 5.10.2017 1.00 Uhr Bali Zeit (MEZ+6): Zentral Bali: Business as usual. Gunung ist aktuell ruhig. ... See MoreSee Less

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Kein Statusupdate bis Mittwoch Abend Bali Zeit. Wir hoffen Gunung Agung läßt unsere Anreise zu. ... See MoreSee Less

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Status 3.10.2017 1.30 Uhr MEZ: Unverändert, Business as usual.

Anbei: Niyepi Laut bedeutet „Tag der Stille des Meeres“... der ist am 6.10.2017 von 0.00-0.00 Uhr. In und um Bali fahren KEINE Wasserfahrzeuge.
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Update: 01.10.2017 14.oo Uhr MEZ: Die Aktivität des #Gunung #Agung nimmt temporär ab. ABER: von #Entwarnung und #Sicherheit sollte nicht gesprochen werden! Eine kurze Beruhigung ist vor einem größeren #Vulkanausbruch nicht selten. Jetzt gilt: durchatmen, Kräfte sammeln und abwarten, vorbereitet sein!
Und durch die #indojunkies Gruppe gibt es für den verregneten Sonntag in Deutschland auch wenigstens einen informativen Zeitverteib: www.travelmedicus.com/downloads/gunungapi.mp4
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travelmedicus.com

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Keine Veränderung des Status. Aber eine nette Grafik 😉 ... See MoreSee Less

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Update29.9.2017 11.00 UHr MEZ:
#Vulkan #Gunung #Agung wird aktiver.

FYI - IMPORTANT

Recent Official Gunung Agung Status Update has been Released:-

Excerpt as follows

(14) Remarks : Based on our visual and instrumental observation, Agung volcano is exhibiting heightened unrest with increased likelihood of eruption

Update in Full

Agung 20170929/0046Z
(1) VOLCANO OBSERVATORY NOTICE FOR AVIATION - VONA
(2) Issued : 20170929/0046Z
(3) Volcano : Agung (264020)
(4) Current Aviation Colour Code : ORANGE
(5) Previous Aviation Colour Code : orange
(6) Source : Agung Volcano Observatory
(7) Notice Number : 2017AGU10
(8) Volcano Location : S 08 deg 20 min 31 sec E 115 deg 30 min 29 sec
(9) Area : Bali, Indonesia
(10) Summit Elevation : 10054 FT (3142 M)
(11) Volcanic Activity Summary : Low pressure white plume, likely dominated by water vapor, is observed emitting continuously from the main crater at 0045 UTC (0745 Central Indonesia Time)
(12) Volcanic Cloud Height : Ash cloud not visible.
(13) Other Volcanic Cloud Information : Plume is observed emitting continuously from the main crater and reached an altitude of approximately 100 m and moving to West
(14) Remarks : Based on our visual and instrumental observation, Agung volcano is exhibiting heightened unrest with increased likelihood of eruption
(15) Contacts : Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources
Geological Agency
Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM)
Tel: +62-22-727-2606
Facsimile: +62-22-720-2761
Email : vsi@vsi.esdm.go.id, gunungapi@vsi.esdm.go.id
(16) Next Notice : A new VONA will be issued if conditions change significantly or the colour code is changes.
Latest Volcanic information is posted at VONA | MAGMA Indonesia Website
Link :
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Update 27.09.2017 15.00 MEZ:
(thx to Vicki Ruhr from Bali Travel Group for translation and posting, also for the graph [Gabe Knox Monson / JackiePomeroy]):

Update from National Board for Disaster Management
The latest update from the authorities, translated into English, at 7pm on Wednesday 27 September 2017 is as follows.
Mount Agung volcanic activity in Bali is still high.
Today there were 329 times shallow volcanic earthquakes, 444 deep volcanic earthquake, and 56 local tectonic earthquake. The number and strength of the quakes was bigger than yesterday.
There was white smoke observed some 50m above of peak of the crater.
Magma movement approaching the surface continues.
The chances of the eruption are quite large. But it can not be ascertained when it will erupt with certainty.
There are nearly 100,000 people evacuated.
The number of refugees is expected to increase. People outside the evacuation zones are also moving to safer places. There is some enforcement issues around defining the banned area, which has signs. But five sirens have even installed to give early warning around the mountain Gunung Agung.
from
Sutopo Purwo Nugroho
Head of Information Data and Public Relations Center of BNPB

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For all bahasa indo speaking people (please also share to the!):

www.bnpb.go.id/home/detail/3472/Kegempaan-Gunung-Agung-Tetap-Tinggi,-96.086-Jiwa-Mengungsi
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Dr. Janine Krippner (Vulkanologin) bestätigt die Tipps im Umgang mit Ascheregen: ... See MoreSee Less

Hi everyone. In the possible event of Agung volcano erupting ash, it is important to know what to do, and how to prepare beforehand. If ash is erupted, the locations that will get ash will depend on how much ash is erupted (eruption type and size), and the wind direction. You can learn more about volcanic ash across a wide range of aspects (what it is like during ashfall, health, cleanup, water, transportation, power, buildings, power supply, agriculture) here: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/health.html Pamphlets are available that you can refer to and print out (some have been helping to print and hand these out - you are all wonderful) can be found in several languages, including Indonesian. This includes what to do before, during, and after an eruption. This is located here: www.ivhhn.org/pamphlets.html Ash can be harmful to your airways and lungs, especially if you have any preexisting conditions. Information on the recommended face masks based on research, with an update specifically for the Agung situation, is here: www.ivhhn.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=102 Keep your eyes protected. Having personally had volcanic ash in my eye - I can tell you that you do not want this. Ash is pulverized and sharp rock, glass, and crystals. Having goggles that keep ash away from your eyes can help. I have seen some pretty neat ones that people have found for kids in Bali.

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Update 26.09.2017 14.30 Uhr MEZ:
Der Status für den Luftverkehr wurde von GELB auf ORANGE geändert.
Der Flughafen ist weiterhin geöffnet und operiert "as usual".

Kurz erklärt:
Für den internationalen Luftverkehr gelten (bei Beeinträchtigungen durch Vulkane) vier Farben als Status (Grün/Gelb/Orange/Rot).

Für den Krisenstatus am Boden gelten in Indonesien Levelbezeichnungen:
1 Code Grün, 2 Code Gelb, 3 Code Orange und 4 Code Rot.
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Die App Quakefeed und die offizielle indonesische Webseite
magma.vsi.esdm.go.id/ bestätigen:
Es hat sich ein Vulkanisches Erdbeben am Gunung Agung mit einer Magnitude von 4.2 SR ereignet.
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Nur um es klarzustellen: Bleibt ruhig. ... See MoreSee Less

Bali Volcano Update. First, what's not true. There is... 1. No Tsunami threat. 2. No island wide threat. 3. No eruption at as Monday 6.00 pm, Western Indonesia Time - UTC +8 4. No mass evacuation, fleeing or panic. What we do have. 1. Lots of tremors. 2. Vulcanologists saying this is indicative of a imminent eruption 3. A level 4 (out of 4) alert warning an eruption is imminent. 4. A 12 Km evacuation zone and about 34,000 displaced villagers. Mount Agung is 32 Km away from our house in Central Ubud. On a clear day we can see it. It's an ash type volcano rather than a lava type and last erupted in 1963 and 1,000 people on the mountain were killed, which is why they have been evacuated this time around. If there is an eruption - which is deemed likely but not certain - the danger zone will be about 6 Km, rocks the size of your head and smaller. And ash. The ash clouds are all wind dependent and no one has any clue how much of that we will get. The prevailing winds are friendly, blowing the ash offshore, but winds are unpredictable creatures and we don't know what will happen. My lovely wife has been working lots of hours volunteering to administer part of the relief effort to get supplies to the mountain people who are sitting in evacuation centres with not much stuff/money, while I sit at home monitoring the situation from Central Control (the couch). Am I scared? No. Am I apprehensive? Yes What's my plan? Get ash masks for the family & wait. That's it. Please feel free to share anywhere. Kirk Out.

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Info am Rande, unabhängig vom Vulkangeschehen:
Ab dem 1. Oktober 2017 kann die Nutzung der Toll-Road DPS Airport - Sanur - Nusa Dua nicht mehr in bar bezahlt werden. Die neue elektronische Bezahlmöglichkeit ist eine Karte und kann unter anderem im Indomart für 25k IDR erworben werden. Sie ist unbegrenzt gültig und kann wieder aufgeladen werden.

From 1st October onward the Nusa Dua toll for motors only with prepaid card. You can buy this card in Indomart, it costs 25000 IDR and doesnt have expire date.
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Who will help to realize this fantastic idea? ... See MoreSee Less

Dear Friends of Bali. Agung Siaga is opening up a public kitchen at Warung 9 Angels, Ubud where volunteers will cook 200 meals every day to be distributed to needing evacuation sites. We will start cooking Tuesday (26 Sept '17) morning 8 AM, and every day onwards. This is a call for volunteers to help with cooking and packing the meals. No need to sign up, just show up at Warung 9 Angels, Ubud. Please also spread the word and LIKE Agung Siaga's Facebook page for updates on the situation, relief efforts, and to make a donation or volunteer some support. www.facebook.com/agungsiaga.ubud/ We have provided very clear details on goods that will help, as well as contact details for the organisers should you need more info. Thanks in advance for your kind support. Take care and be safe. Loves 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼 Agung Siaga on Facebook www.facebook.com/agungsiaga.ubud/ Contacts: Tunjung Crystal 081338885287 Kusumorini Susanto 081310516754 --- Agung Siaga membuka dapur umum di Warung 9 Angels dimana kami akan memasak 200 nasi bungkus setiap hari ntuk disalurkan ke posko-posko yang memerlukan. Kami akan mulai memasak dari hari Selasa (26 Sept '17). Kami membutuhkan sukarelawan untuk membantu memasak dan membungkus nasi. Tidak perlu mendaftar, silahkan langsung datang ke Warung 9 Angels

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Kurz erklärt: ... See MoreSee Less

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Update: 22.9.2017 19:00 MEZ auch Tulamben / Rendang / culik / Bebandem und Umgebung wird evakuiert. ... See MoreSee Less

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Aktuelle News (22.9.2017 MEZ 13.00Uhr):
10.000 Menschen in gefährdeter Region um den Mt. Agung wurden bereits evakuiert, die Evakuierung ist noch nicht abgeschlossen.
Der Nachbarvulkan und sehr beliebter Ausflugsspot Mt. Batur rumpelt seit gestern Abend ebenfalls.
Der Status ist zu finden unter:
magma.vsi.esdm.go.id/
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Achtung: nordwestlich von Bali (Kemeduran - Java) ereignete sich ein Erdbeben der Stärke 5,7 in einer Tiefe von 588km. Es gibt bisher keine offizielle Tsunami-Warnung, dennoch ist durch vermehrte seismische Aktivität Achtung geboten.

Die App QuakeFeed informiert aktuell über Beben und Tsunami-Warnungen.

Be alert - not alarmed.

Attention: northwest from Bali (Kemeduran - Java) was a earthquake detected with a magnitude of 5.7 in a depth of 588km. There are no official tsunami warnings, but because of more and more seismic activities you have to be alerted.
(Picture by dailymail.co.uk)
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